It does.

seriously.

This is the art of Brian Duey. 

Here’s his bio:

(i put the interesting parts in bold)

Bio:

My name is Brian Duey. I was born and raised in Grand Rapids, Michigan. I attended a public school in a small village called Grandville where I was first introduced to art. I was never serious about it growing up but discovered a love for it in my early 20’s. I was sitting around the house one day and decided to get out a pencil and draw. I immediately fell in love with it and wanted to do it all the time. With every drawing I did, I got a little better. I developed my own techniques and tricks along the way. I strive to produce realistic looking drawings and add my own conceptual ideas too. I often get asked if I ever took any art classes. The answer is, no, I am completely self taught. 

My work has been published in books and greeting cards, on CD covers, and in various magazines. I have been doing commissions since 2005 and I’ve done work for clients all over the world. Most of my commissions come from the United States, the UK, and Canada but I have shipped works as far away as Ireland. My work has been featured in galleries in the United States. In 2007 I was asked for a portrait of Britney Spears to be featured in an art gallery in Hollywood, California. This event was covered by MTV and gained me a lot more exposure. In 2010 I was commissioned by Detroit Lions player, Cliff Avril to do a colored pencil drawing for him. I don’t plan on slowing down anytime soon with my artwork. There are plenty of opportunities that await. One of my goals for the future is to get an instructional drawing book published. 

~ I want to know who that model was that modeled nude for a colored pencil artist. That poor girl.

*In his defense the b&w drawings were from 2004. 

Here are some drawing tips he has graced us with:

Here is a list of drawing tips that I have assembled together. Some are things I learned myself and some are helpful tips that other artists have given me. I hope you learn something from these tips.

-when working on a drawing, compare tones with other tones 

-if a highlight needs to be more prominent, this can be achieved by making the surrounding area darker 

-never touch an area of the paper that will recieve graphite. Your skin has oils in it that will show up after you touch the paper, much like dusting for fingerprints. 

-remember to make smooth gradients when shading. In most cases, dark tones do not flow directly into lighter tones, there are alot of midtones in between. 

-the whites of eyes are not white, they will always recieve tone and will often have highlights. 

-teeth are not white, they will always recieve tone and will often have highlights 

-there should be very few, if any, hard lines on a portrait. Portraits are made with tone gradients, not lines. 

-hair should not be drawn with lines but drawn with tones. 

-blu-tak or any adhesive putty works well to pull out tones as an eraser 

-make sure not to blend over highlights. keep them clean for best results. 

-if you are right handed, work from left to right, top to bottom so you don’t have to rest your hand over finished parts of a drawing. vice-versa for lefties. 

-fly-away hairs can add to the realism of a portrait 

-all highlights aren’t white 

-focus can add to realism. Making your subject sharp and focussed and the background blurry can add alot of depth to a drawing 

-keep an object’s edges sharp and polished in most cases 

-to achieve a dark background with a minimal glare, use a mechanical 3B graphite pencil. A sharp Mechanical Pencil breaks in the fibres of the paper, diminishing the glare that a wood pencil would most likely create. 

-after a drawing is framed, the glare from graphite will be less obvious behind glass 

-regular kleenex tissues are good for blending 

-spraying Fixative  on a finished drawing will add protection against unwanted smearing and will diminish glare 

-the sky is the limit with drawing if you are willing to put in the time and practice 

-patience is key, take your time 

-if you cut corners and work quickly, it will show in your drawing 

-be careful with hard pencils (5H, 2H). Pressing down hard on them will dent your paper and ruin the fibres 

-dark is not always black and light is not always white 

-work one small area at a time

~ Y’all i’m not making this blog to be mean. I think there are some really great things to be said about “outside artist” but this guy…. camonnnn….

Then again, at least he is doing something.

A TREE GROWS IN BOSTON

Tom Eiler, 2006

15.5” x 17.5”

Acrylic on Canvas
 
Purchased by Mike Frank at a Boston thrift shop, April 2011

 

A young man in an urban setting dreams of life in the country. We know he is dreaming of it because the color of his eyes is the same color as the sky in the pastoral image. Sadly, this tree exists only in his head. The harsh demarcation between the rusty urban sky behind his head and the idyllic view of his dreams is a harsh indication that they are worlds apart. In desperation, he stretches forth his hand to touch the tree. But he will never reach it.
Congratulations to Sarahlynn Nichols who composed this interpretation. Ms Nichols has won a copy of the book “Museum Of Bad Art: Masterworks” and is allowed, even encouraged, to use the title Museum Of Bad Art Guest Interpretator in all personal and business situations.


~ Featured work at MoBA. Much like acrylic, feelings can be goopy and hard to work with. Thankfully it looks like he laid it down thick. Hope it helped Tim, I really do.

A TREE GROWS IN BOSTON


Tom Eiler, 2006


15.5” x 17.5”



Acrylic on Canvas


Purchased by Mike Frank at a Boston thrift shop, April 2011


 

A young man in an urban setting dreams of life in the country. We know he is dreaming of it because the color of his eyes is the same color as the sky in the pastoral image. Sadly, this tree exists only in his head. The harsh demarcation between the rusty urban sky behind his head and the idyllic view of his dreams is a harsh indication that they are worlds apart. In desperation, he stretches forth his hand to touch the tree. But he will never reach it.

Congratulations to Sarahlynn Nichols who composed this interpretation. Ms Nichols has won a copy of the book “Museum Of Bad Art: Masterworks” and is allowed, even encouraged, to use the title Museum Of Bad Art Guest Interpretator in all personal and business situations.

~ Featured work at MoBA. Much like acrylic, feelings can be goopy and hard to work with. Thankfully it looks like he laid it down thick. Hope it helped Tim, I really do.

(Source: museumofbadart.org)

This is a more controversial piece.
This artist, though only in the 11th grade, really makes you wonder, “if they can get along, why can’t we?”
Lets let the past be the past and just get along. Live, laugh, love. 

This is a more controversial piece.

This artist, though only in the 11th grade, really makes you wonder, “if they can get along, why can’t we?”

Lets let the past be the past and just get along. Live, laugh, love. 

The works of Gary Romig. Pigeon Art.

His process:

” I do most of my art work on the computer. I use Photoshop CS4 and a Wacom graphics pad. In the first photo I am using my Mac computer and working on details of a hummingbird. You can see that working this way allows me to zoom into the very finest details.

I begin the process by bring up a photo of a bird’s habitat that I have taken with my digital camera (Nikon D-40 or Canon G3). This photo becomes the background and bottom layer of the drawing. Working in photo shop, I create an additional layer above the background layer and begin to sketch into that layer using the stylus and graphic pad.

I find it best to work in layers at the very beginning. I create a new layer for each major element. In this image the blur of the wings is created using several layers. Each layer can be adjusted as to its transparency at any time. You can experiment with how much blur is added to the wings.

The work is very rough at first. I work primarily on the pose of the bird trying to integrate it into the elements of the photo. I often use reference photos which I took of the bird to help me create the pose. I will keep changing the pose right until the very end of the drawing.

As I begin to work on the finish texture of the bird I try to keep in mind the light as it appears in the background photo and work to keep the light on the bird consistent with the background photo.

I like to work on the texture of the bird. I try to capture the different textures like the wet shinny eye, the plastic smoothness of the beak and the criss-crossing overlapping surface of the feathers

The sequence of photos on the left and down the page show a progression of completion to the final image. The image was complete after 2 months off and on work. There is a lot of editing and re-editing. That is what I like about working in Photoshop. If I feel I have to make a major change in the image I have no fear of doing so.”

(Source: artofbirds.com)